Recommendations for introducing greater safeguards and transparency into CS conference funding

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In Part 1 of this piece, I provided evidence of the extent to which some of the world’s top computer science conferences are financially reliant upon some of the world’s most powerful technology companies. In this second part, I lay out a set of recommendations for ways to help ensure that these entanglements of industry and academia don’t grant companies undue influence over the conditions of knowledge creation and exchange.

To be clear, I am not suggesting that conferences stop accepting money from tech companies, nor am I saying there is no place for Big Tech investment in academic research. I am simply advocating for conference organizers to adopt greater safeguards to increase transparency and mitigate the potential agenda-setting effects associated with companies’ funding of and presence in academic spaces.

While I am not claiming that sponsors have any say over which papers are or aren’t published, in the next few paragraphs I will show how agenda-setting can happen in a much more subtle yet pervasive way.

Resurrecting conferences as “trading zones”

Setting the agenda in a given field means determining and prioritizing topics of focus and investment. Research priorities are not neutral or naturally occurring—they are the result of social and political construction. And because a great deal of CS funding comes from tech companies, these priorities are likely to be shaped by what is considered valuable or profitable to those companies.

An example of the tech industry’s agenda-setting power includes the way in which AI/ML research has

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